Reviews related to : Benq

870273 BenQ GW2455H 2

BenQ GW2455H

This is a multi-connection easy to use and to setup 24inch flat panel. It is literally open the box clip the connection between the base and back into the back of the panel and then clip the base into that, plug in the leads and you are done, two minutes at most.
This BenQ GW2455H LED monitor measures 57x34x1.6cm; the stand is oval at 24x19cm and raises the panel by 10cm from your desk. The viewable screen is 52x29.5cm which gives the notional diagonal imperial measurement of 23.6inches. There is a line of connections mid-way up the back on an overhang, to the left of the support arm, VGA, Digital and HDMI and to the right the three pin kettle style power input.
A rather nice 27inch panel from BenQ but while I am not greatly in favour of long names I would have thought of something that flows off the tongue better than EW2775ZH. Still this is about the usability of the unit and not its name.
It is 61x36x2cm and it has a stand that is 31x17cm in the shape of an upside down ‘T’ so only the front 6.5cm is the full 31cm width. It raises the screen by 8.5cm from your desk; there is good back tilt and more front tilt than most units. No side to side movement is available but of course you could turn the whole unit. The now standard claim for most panels is that they can be viewed from 178 degrees from each side.
BenQ manufacturers a range of monitors for different situations including this business model
Designed for a business environment, the BenQ BL-2405 model is a 24-inch backlight monitor with the capability to act in portrait and landscape modes depending upon your needs.  This combination of display screen and adjustable stand has dimensions of 503 x 579 x 213mm in portrait orientation and 392 x 579 x 213mm when used in landscape mode.  There is also an option to wall mount the unit if desk space is a problem.
This is an LED backlight monitor that is kind to the eyes and also is part of their value series. So what does this have to offer that will tempt you away from whatever you are currently using.
Normally whatever panel I am reviewing gets attached to my review system that gets all the new software and hardware. Currently my main system is at the local repair shop so whatever day to day files I need have been installed on this unit from my last backup – yes they do have a use – and this panel will get an even more rigorous test as it now is attached to my machine for emails etc. as well as testing so in use all day every day. It is 22x56x2.5cm, the viewable screen is 29.5x52.
To the best of my limited medical knowledge I think they have yet to perfect eye transplants. So we are stuck with the pair we are born with, one way to knacker your eyes is staring at a screen for far too long each day, the manufacturers have produced certain things to help like ‘eye care’ in the case of BenQ.
This 28inch panel from BenQ measures 65.5x38.5x2cm the last figure is at the edges. It comes with a rectangular stand 32x11cm that raises the screen by 10cm from your desk. There is a good amount of back tilt but almost no forward movement beyond vertical. Since panels are now much lighter the manufacturers have decided that side to side movement is not required. Viewing from either side is always good and it is easy to twist the whole unit if required.
This flat panel from BenQ is one of a growing range that not only want to give you a crisp clear but also are aware of the damage that can be done to eyes by Blue light so that is possibly the one stand out selling point for eye health.
The Benq GW2870H monitor measures 65x37x2cm the latter is at the edges. It comes with a 11.5x32cm base that extends in the central area to 30cm where it is attached to the arm. The stand raises the panel by 10cm from your desk; there is no side to side movement but a reasonable amount of back tilt and a small amount of forward tilt. The base of the stand attaches via a twist screw to the arm. The viewable screen is 62x34cm which gives the diagonal imperial measurement of 28inches.
This is a 27inch flat panel designed for those you need accurate and rapid display, yes it’s something designed for gamers. As it says on the carton ‘Gaming is in the details’ so this 27inch panel gives all the detail with rapid refresh rates.
This Benq gaming monitor measures 64x37.5x2.4cm, the latter at the edges. Its stand is in the form of an inverted ‘T’ with the front part being 35x7.5cm and the stroke being 13.5cm deep with the uplift being on the stroke. This raises the screen by 10cm from your desk or table. There is a good amount of back tilt and a little forward movement from the vertical. The viewable screen is 59x33.5cm and that gives the notional imperial diagonal measurement of 27inches.
As a breed apart, dedicated hardcore gamers demand the ultimate performance from their computer equipment set up. Issues, such as motion blur, flicker-free, refresh rate and response time, are considered to be paramount in the gaming world. This is the arena where milliseconds can mean the difference between success and failure. Naturally the monitor, providing the window into the world for ultimate achievers, has an important role to play.
Recently I have been checking out the BenQ XL2720Z ultimate gaming monitor.  This kit consists of a 27-inch LCD monitor, two-piece stand, a selection of leads for power, D-sub, DVI-D dual link and USB connections.  There is also an S Switch device which acts as a remote control for switching between display settings that can be designated for gaming, work and entertainment.
When the name of BenQ pops up, my thoughts immediately turn towards the range of display units produced by the company. However BenQ does have other strings to its bow as the arrival of a new product clearly indicates. This product is the treVolo which is claimed to be the world’s first portable electrostatic wireless speaker. Just in case you are not familiar with the term then I should explain that electrostatic drivers emit sound both forwards and backwards with mid and high range frequencies their target area.
When you first remove the treVolo from its packaging, it is a wedged shaped solid device that is encircled by a dark grey metallic collar.  In this state, the unit has dimensions of 176.6 x 134.6 x 78.5mm (H x D x W).  On either side of the device are panels which, when flipped out, add a bird-swooping like effect while increasing the width to 275.1mm.  These wings provide the electrostatic output with audio delivered from the front and back.
Secondhand bargains apart, there are a couple of kinds of really low cost projectors you can buy: no-name brands of dubious origin, and low resolution business projectors intended mostly to display charts and presentations. For different reasons, none of these will be much fun for home entertainment viewing. Yes, you’ll get a big screen, and it might even be watchable - for a while. If all you’re used to is a 36 inch TV you might even be temporarily impressed. But the odds are that the loss of nuance in the picture details, or problems with focus, or the jerkiness of the motion, or the screaming inaccuracy of the colour will send you back to your TV before the month is out.
However something very interesting has been happening in the home entertainment market over the past few years. Low end projectors capable of showing very decent big screen video have been turning up from brand-name manufacturers at the sort of price you’d expect to pay for a modestly specced 42 inch TV. We’re talking of decent, liveable-with projectors that cost only a couple of hundred quid or so more than those problematic cheapos. That’s the good news.
838312 BenQ EW2740L LED VA 27  inch W 1920 x 1080 Monito

BenQ EW2740

Not quite the specifications – or price - of the last offering from Ben Q but still a rather nice 27ince flat panel, this one suitable for those of us who cannot quite justify the price tag associated with the higher specification that it offered.
The screen of the BenQ EW2740 measures 62x37x2cm, the stand is 31x12cm with the support arm protruding back by another 7cm in the central area. The stand raises the screen by 8cm from your desk. The viewable screen is 60x33cm giving notional diagonal imperial screen size of 27 inches. The total weight is 4.2kilos. The unit has a good amount of back tilt stated to be 20 degrees and a tiny amount of forward tilt. All the connections are in a vertical column on the support arm.
Not just a large screen panel but a very high resolution one. In fact the only way you will get to use it at the highest resolution is if you connect it via Display Port, but I am told that the next version of HDMI should support it.
The BenQ 27inch BL2710 measures 63x38x3cm. The stand is 37x26cm but only the back middle is as much as 26cm where the circular hydraulic arm is, the rest is only 19cm deep. In its lowest position the arm raises the screen by only 1cm from the desk but it can raise it by as much as 14cm. All these figures are in Landscape mode but it can be used in Portrait mode by a simple 90degree turn and when used via Display Port it changes the orientation of the screen automatically.
If you're looking for a projector (and why wouldn't you be - good ones are abundant and cheap these days, and deliver much more screen real estate for your money than TV sets), you don't necessarily have to seek out the top the range get yourself and your family into the home cinema game. True, what I'd call fully-fledged "home cinema" is costly to set up. But if you have a blank wall and an existing hi-fi system there are bargains out there just waiting round the whole thing off for you. BenQ's flagship W1500 may be a candidate.
Sporting a brown, cream and silver styling that wouldn't have been out of place in the 1950s, the BenQ  W1500 is a 2200 lumens mid-range single-chip 3D-capable DLP projector that weighs in at 4.5kg and measures 340*120*285mm (width/height/depth).
This is a panel with that little bit extra. Instead of it being the now norm 1920x1080 this is 1920x1200 and that little extra means that bit more depth, great for viewing more of anything be it a spreadsheet a word processing document or a web page.
The BenQ BL2411PT measures 55.5x36x2.5cm at the edges. The 25.5x21cm rectangular stand raises it by 8cm from whatever you sit it on. All these figures assume you are using it in landscape mode. The fact that it can be rotated to portrait is the reason for the large arm towards the back of the stand. While on about the rear there are three connections available in a horizontal line on the back left VGA (D-Sub), Digital and Display Port.
Looking at this panel alongside others of a like size makes it look tiny. It isn’t but the borders around the screen are so despite it being a 22inch panel that offers full 1920x1080 display it still looks a lot smaller and takes up less space.
The BenQ GW2265M  measures 50x29x2cm, the viewable screen is 48x26.5cm which gives the notional imperial measurement of 21.5 inches. The weight including the stand is tad under 3.25kilos. the stand is a clip on oval 21x18cm. While the screen surround is shiny black the screen itself is less reflective so gives a good clear image even in strong daylight but of course try to avoid direct sunlight onto the screen.
This is a nice sharp panel, it has the ability to be used as one of a multiple panel display and can also be rotated 90degrees to be used as portrait which for those writing long items or viewing endless web pages saves a lot of scrolling.
I did not mention what for a lot of people would be an added plus point the ability to display 1920x1200 or of course 1200x1920 and to save you checking the default for most panels is 1920x1080. The screen is 55x35cm giving the notional diagonal imperial measurement of 24inches. The stand raises it a minimum of 10cm from your desk but this can be as much as 22cm using the hydraulic touch control on the back to raise it. The stand footprint is 25x17cm and the total depth of the unit is 22cm.
Spending time on a computer can be productive and entertaining but it can also produce some other less appealing side effects which this next monitor offers to alleviate.
Back in the early days of movie making, and I am referring to those first black & white offerings, the audience had to put up with a great deal of on-screen flicker as the images were being constantly updated.  This flickering phenomenon was the reason why a visit to the cinema was later often referred to as “going to the flicks” or in some cases “going to the bug hut” but this was for another reason and had nothing to do with flicker.
While this name may be new to you I have followed their introduction to the UK a few years ago, now they are firmly here in the camera, projector and flat panel aeras.
This is a small - shirt pocket - but quite powerful digital camera. It is 8.5x5x2cm and the weight is only just over 100grams. It is a 6MP offering with the standard 3x zoom. It has a Pentax lens 6.2 to 18.6mm. The unit is brushed silver and grey, the front has the lens and the flash and although they are fairly close it does not seem to suffer to much from Red Eye.