Reviews related to : Coffee

There was a time not that long back where coffee at home was either of the instant variety or involved lots of ground coffee, a filter machine or a cafeteria. The range you could produce was limited and there was no way you'd get that coffee shop cappuccino effect! In the age of convenience this has all changed with a huge variety of pod and capsule based devices that look like works of art on your kitchen work top. All the major brand from Krups to Nescaf to Braun and Kenwood have products to tempt you!

Coffee Machines have always been popular with Gadgetspeak readers and none more so than those produced by Nescafe Krups. However it’s been quite a few years since I could get my hands on one and they certainly have changed a lot.
This unit is designed for the small home and is quite small in its worktop width, it is 16.5cm wide 32cm deep and 18cm tall when shut and 31cm tall when open and ready to use. This small size means that the water container is also quite small and it can take no more than two pints of water.
This machine uses pod coffee from Lavazza and they do a huge range so you should find at least one you like, it also has a fool proof milk frother jug as part of the unit now there is no longer an excuse not to have a perfect Cappuccino at home.
The Lavazza A Modo Mio Fantasia coffee machine measures 32x17x27cm, the last figure needs some extra clearance as the mechanism to insert the pods requires this to be lifted to move the used pods to the internal storage area and this adds around 12cm to the height. Do remember to empty this regularly as it also contains waste coffee from the pod and otherwise it can overflow.
While it is a pod coffee machine the Bosch Tassimo Joy can dispense other hot drinks and unlike most coffee machines it accepts coffee from a range of manufacturers and so if you have a favourite coffee shop brand and they do a Tassimo pod then you can have your fix at home.
This coffee machine is 28cm tall – this increases to 36cm when the top is open to insert a pod – 22cm wide at the front and 34cm deep. Before you can start using it you need to follow the instructions to flush the unit out and this unit comes with Britta Filter tablets to ensure good water.
This is one of a range of machines by Sage marketed under the Heston Blumenthal name. If you need to ask who he is then you have either being living on a remote island or have no interest in food beyond baked beans and sausages.
This machine is fairly basic in that it has no bean grinder but if you like your coffee then you probably have somewhere where they roast and grind – use your nose – if it’s there you will find it. The smell of fresh roasted coffee will entice almost anyone. The machine is 30cm deep, 25cm wide and 32cm tall so should fit on most worktops. The water container fits into the rear of the machine and can hold up to 1.8litres of water. The hard wired mains lead is 1.
As you get older you do not function properly in the morning without your first fix of coffee. If it requires little or no effort to make it so much the better. Here a small device that you’re only real input is to switch it on and insert a pod.
The smell as it mixes with the water in the cup – you did put the cup under the output – is enough to start your senses maybe even open your eyes and see that it’s not raining so maybe today will not be that bad after all. It is 30cm deep, 14cm wide and 25cm tall, these figures are with power lead inserted and water in the rear tank so these are figures ready for you to stagger in and push the power button.
This coffee machine takes coffee beans in the top and grinds them and then prepares the coffee adds the water and then makes your coffee. It is a complete process so you cannot get fresher ground beans as it grinds them to make the cup of coffee.
It is 30cm deep, 23cm wide and 35cm tall at the bean storage area. There is a 28 page A5 booklet that covers operation and setting up as well as cleaning the product in sixteen languages. Seven of these pages use diagrams to cover most things then there is a single page in each language to cover more obscure things like setting up your favourite coffee strengths etc. It also explains the less obvious icons that the front display shows.
At one time we used to be known as a nation of tea drinkers. Now, however, there has been a sea change and coffee has taken over as the national beverage of choice for those not hooked on something with a stronger effect.
You only have to walk down any High Street to see the evidence as big brand coffee shops are springing up all over the place and plying their wares of various coffee-based drinks that old-timers, such as myself, find confusing despite the attractive aroma wafting from these premises.  Even pubs, with their wide range of alcoholic beverages, are now selling coffee to their customers.
Over the years I have reviewed a number of coffee machines, all have been very popular with readers, some seem to think that the coffee from ‘Pod’ machines is not hot enough, so this unit that uses fresh milk that it heats could be their answer.
This machine has one huge plus over other Lavazza machines for those who love Cappuccinos and Lattes a milk froth maker is attached. The size without the milk froth maker attached to the right side is 28x21x23cm the unit wider at the front and is only 12cm at the rear, the hard wired mains lead emerges from under the water tank so these figures are maximum.
Here it is the long awaited coffee machine and what a machine it is. While I have reviewed numerous machines before this is the first that uses fresh roasted beans, not ground coffee, unground beans freshly ground in the machine for each cup.
A new experience for me and by some way the largest machine I have used, still it’s a lot smaller than that found in a decent coffee shop. It is 26.5x39x35cm and you will need access to the left side to remove the compacted used coffee grounds every so often, maybe every two days or so dependent on use.
With such a name you would expect this machine to be made in Italy after all the Italians can make a very good cup of coffee. This machine however is made in Germany a country perhaps more famous for making quality cars, it is made by AEG.
This is a pod machine where the operation is so easy they state an 8 year old child should be safe to use it. Once unboxed and the ten pieces of tape that secure it are removed you just have to remove the foam strip from under the water container and follow the rinsing instructions.
It’s no secret that to me black coffee is a no no, my days of alcoholic excess are long gone and I prefer something smoother so milk is required. I do like my milk frothy so a device to pump steam in while making good coffee is for me.
This unit is 30x22.5x23cm. The unit is predominately white but the sides are a ribbed black and the area behind the coffee spout is also black. On top there is a chromed strip which lifts up to insert the pod and to the right of the front another chromed area the steam spout. There are three buttons on the face, bottom left on/off, top left heating button, top right steam button. On the right side at the top front a twist knob that is either off (vertical) or on (horizontal).
While the presence of coffee shops on the High Street continues to grow, we still need a means of providing our favourite beverage in the home.
Don’t get the wrong impression if I mention that I am a Mug sort of guy.  Let me explain what I mean by that remark.  I am the type of person who has always preferred having their hot beverage, whether it was tea of coffee, in a mug rather than a cup.  Mainly because a mug holds more of the refreshing liquid but I suppose there is also some of my northern upbringing in there as well.
Coffee makers seem one of the most popular reviews on Gadgetspeak so when I got my chance to try the Dualit Coffee system it seemed to good a chance to miss. While I prefer white coffee this can make both black and white.
Looking at the unit it seems very like a small version of the soft of unit you see in thousands of coffee shops in the UK. It is 20x26x32cm and is of course chromium for easy cleaning. The exception is the back that has a clear plastic with blue tinge and black lid removable water container that lifts out it can contain up to 1.5 litres of water. Hard wired into the back is a 1metre mains lead.
It is time for a breakfast break as I indulge in a heavy session of consuming toast and coffee.
Up until recently I had no idea that Panasonic has a division that dealt with home appliances.  I had always regarded Panasonic as a company that concentrated its energies on the development and manufacture of televisions, cameras and similar products such as the DECT phone currently sitting on my right hand side waiting to choose the opportune moment to interrupt my chain of thought with an incoming telephone call.
On first inspection the Melody 2 looks very like the machine I reviewed in December 2008. In fact the only differences are inside the machine as all the controls for it are in the same places; however I do not remember the first unit being called Melody.
The Nescafé Dolce Gusto Melody 2 coffee maker measures 30cm from back to front, 20cm from side to side and 33cm from base to the top of the silvered hot/cold switcher. The part number is all but the same with just the forth digit varying the original was KP210040 and this is the Melody 2 being KP210640 and this could be important as stocks of the old one are certainly still available in shops.
Three things are certain to start an argument, religion, football and coffee. Stearing well away from the first two I look at my first machine from Nespresso, I have looked at several Dolce Gusto machines but this is my first Nespresso.
The first thing I noticed is that it does what coffee should – keep you awake – I had two shots late afternoon and it was twelve hours later before I could get to sleep, not what I wanted but in future I will keep my Nespresso hits till the morning. It is 36x18x28cm and you will need another 10cm of clearance on the 28cm to allow the top to open to pop the coffee pod in. The 36x18cm figure is an elongated oval shape well actually two long straights and two curves at the end.
The various range of coffee machines from Nescafe bearing the name Dolce Gusto have been amoung the most popular reads, everyone needs coffee to get you going in the morning, some bear the name Krups who make the machine, the coffee that goes in them is Nescafe.
The Nescafé Dolce Gusto Piccolo is undoubtedly the smallest machine; it can hold just enough water for three cups and would be ideal for the small flat. It is a maximum of 30cm tall, 22cm from front to back and 14.5cm wide, mine was in a nice bright red colour. Whereas the Circolo ( ) had similar water container in the rear this slots into place a lot easier than that container did.
A neat cube shaped coffee machine, with Douwe Egberts coffe pods, certainly packs a punch.
Since the Senseo Quadrante coffee machine from Phillips/Douwe Egberts arrived for review around two weeks ago I would say that I have become a little hooked. I've only drunk one cup of my usual Instant in that time. This little beastie makes tasty, strong coffee with the greatest of ease. Fill the large eight-cup water tank in seconds and then simply pop a Douwe Egberts coffee pod into the tray.
This is the third – and dare I say – the most futuristic Dolce Gusto coffee machine I have reviewed. Firstly I must thank espresso club who pointed the existence of this machine to me long before it was made available for sale in the UK.
Leaving the totally different design for the moment the main difference is that a higher pressure is used to brew the coffee. The machine is shaped like a rather squashed ‘0’ with the actual cup placed in the centre of the ‘0’. The dimensions are 32cm tall, 30cm wide and 18cm deep. The back is made of a plastic material which forms the water tank. The unit is silver grey and somewhat as a surprise to me anyway I cannot see the name anywhere on the box or the unit.
Just over two years ago I reviewed a coffee machine from the people who made the coffee Nescafe. Now there is a new version and this is from the people who make the machine Krups. It’s still the same coffee but the machine is even better.
In the ensuing two years my Dolce Gusto article has been well read and I am told is one of the top reads ever on  it certainly still often features in the monthly top ten reads as it is still an extremely popular coffee machine. So what is new or different well lets deal with the consumables first the Chocolate was launched after the review and has had some favourable comments. If you have a spare half an hour why not read all the numerous comments to my original review.