Reviews related to : Huawei

It was a rainy day in London as I made my way to find out more about the latest Honor handset.
Following the launch of the Huawei Honor 5X, the next product on the cab rank is the Honor 5C handset.  This particular model is available in a choice of gold, silver or grey with the latter being the colour of my review sample.  This handset, aimed at the young and courageous, has a price tag of £149 on a PAYG basis via sources such as Amazon, Ebuyer, Expansys and Honor’s own online store at vMail.eu.
I have already outlined the ‘phone’ part of this latest offering from Huawei on the 18th April. At the time I said I would tell you about the cameras when I had more time to study them. So here goes the camera are very good as they are made by Leica.
Perhaps if you think of this as a camera first and everything a phone does for you second then that gives you an idea of what it can do. Very early on I took a picture of the local lake and right at the top of the image was a branch of a tree that spread almost by mistake into the picture, every nodule of the bark of the branch showed up and although the lake a fountain and the wildlife on the lake were clear and sharp I still remember that branch.
Huawei has added to its range of e-brand smartphones with the release of the Honor 5X handset. Described at the launch as being the most affordable premium smartphone of 2016 (admittedly at the time we were just 35 days into the year), the Honor 5X is aimed at the young, stylish and adventurous type of customers.
The Honor 5X, with dimensions of 151.3 x 76.3 x 8.2mm (H x W x D) and weighing 158g, is available in a choice of gold, silver or, as in the case of the review unit, grey, is a 5.5-inch smartphone.  As is the standard with such devices, the front of the unit, is dominated by the 5.5-inch Full-HD IPS screen.  This screen is of the capacitive touch screen variety and has a resolution of 1080 x 1920 pixels.
This is watch, a fitness device and it tracks your footsteps. More importantly if you wear it while in bed it tells you how well/or not you are sleeping. So what if anything makes this a better device than numerous other such offerings?
The Huawei Talkband B2 measures 4.5x2x.5cm and can be attached to anything or it comes with a wrist strap which is certainly the way I reviewed it. In this way it weighs just 30grams. My unit was black and had a matt black rubber strap. The device clicks into the strap housing. It can fit a wrist between 16.5-22cm my wrist was in the middle of that band in the fifth of ten holes. You need to download an App from either the iOS or Android store.
As part of the Huawei family of offerings, the Honor 6+ is a 5.5-inch smartphone. This is a dual SIM device. However this feature can come at a cost elsewhere but more on this facet a little later. The Honor 6+ is available in a choice of black, white or gold livery.
With a weight of 165g and dimensions of 150.46 x 75.68 x 7.50mm (H x W x D) the Honor 6+ could well be a tight fit for those pockets designated for use to hold your smartphone.  I know I had to arrange the content of my jacket pockets in order to free up a suitable sized pocket to store this handset.  Admittedly the Honor 6+ is not the only handset to suffer from this problem but it does need to be taken into consideration.
A trip down London’s Brick Lane introduced me to a new smartphone from Huawei’s Honor range.
Following the release of its top-of-the-range P8 smartphone, Huawei has now refreshed its Honor range which is aimed more at the budget section of the market.  The Honor 7 is a 5.2-inch smartphone that comes with the tag line of “For The Brave”.  In appearance, this smartphone certainly fits the bill with its fully metallic body that has been air-brushed with a ceramic coating.
Typed the characters “P8” into your favourite search engine and you are likely to get hits that refer to aircrafts, pistols and even electrical engineering software. You should also get links to a new smartphone from Huawei. This is the company’s latest addition to its P series of handsets, namely the P8 which was presented to the world at large at London’s Old Billingsgate event centre.
The Huawei P8 will be available in either standard or premium versions in colour schemes based on silver, gold, black and grey.  My review model, on which this report is based, is the standard Champagne Gold offering which was supplied without any printed documentation.  Fortunately this lack of documentation was not too great a handicap in my testing of the product. The P8 handset has dimensions of 144.9 x 72.1 x 6.4mm (H x W x D) with a weight of 144g.
A visit to a riverside iconic London event centre introduced me to a stylish activity tracker that doubles as a hands-free earpiece.
Wearable products, especially those that cover aspects of healthy living, continue to be a popular item for many.  The latest such device to attach itself to my wrist is the TalkBand B2 from Huawei.  As you might suppose from the “B2” reference, this product is the follow-up and replacement for Huawei’s initial foray into this particular market sector.
The Talkband is a hybrid device incorporating a bluetooth headset and a basic activity monitor. So how good is at these two distinct functions?
This is my first real experience with and so I was quite curious to see what benefits this new category could provide. First of all let me descirbe the device to you. From the image you can see a reasonably marrow strap, one side of which is quite chunky. The chunky side shows a glossy black display which when switched on shows a blue-tinted OLED display.
Available from Vodafone as a less-expensive smartphone is the Huawei Ascend as a PAYG product.
While Huawei gives its various handsets a model number, which is not always easy to remember, the company also provides each of its devices with a more memorable name for marketing purposes.  So, for example, the Huawei model U8815, which is the subject of my next review, is also known as the Ascend G300.  I have to thank Vodafone for kindly supplying the review unit of the Huawei Ascend G300 which has recently had a system upgrade to Android Ice Cream Sandwich.
672613 Huawei U8860 Honour Smartphon

Huawei Honor U8860

While the name of Huawei might not be one of the first names that trips off your tongue when the subject of manufacturers of Android devices is taking place, the company is determined to change that perception with some new products. Recently I took a look at the Huawei MediaPlay tablet and now it is the turn of the Huawei Honor U8860 smartphone.
This is the standard candy mode style of unit.  It is decked out in black and comes with the Android 2.3 operating system.  With dimensions of 122 x 61.5 x 10.9mm (H x W x D) and a weight of 135g, the Honor has a nice comfortable and solid feel to it when in the hand with the two external controls within easy reach.  On the top of the handset is the power button while a volume rocker is located towards the top of the left side.
Towards the end of last year I attended the launch of a new product and then had to wait patiently for over six months before the promised review unit arrived.
While some companies (no names, no pack drill but they know and you know who they are) concentrate on a larger size with their tablet products, others, such as Huawei, have gone for a more pocket sized offering.
This – sometimes called Mi-Fi - allows you to create a wireless network with up to five devices all using the same mobile signal so if your broadband dies or maybe you live in an area where dial up is your only solution providing you have mobile this could be the answer.
If you run a small business what do you do in a power cut, unless you have a standard BT type phone that will be down, Broadband will be down as your modem requires power, unless you keep your notebook charged you will not even have that. So what do you do, sweep the floor – you certainly can’t Hoover it – as you have no power. This then can keep you going for the - hopefully short - time without power providing you have charge in your notebook or Smartphone.
The invitation gave little away other than this was to be a new commercial launch. My interest was further aroused when the location and timing was changed just prior to the event.
Arriving, at the Central London location, notebook (the paper variety) and pen in hand, I quickly discovered that this commercial launch involved not one but two companies and the new kid on the block in the mobile phone platform arena.  Bringing together the combined development and marketing talents of T-Mobile and Huawei with the Android platform is the Pulse.