Reviews related to : Monitors

Forming part of BenQ’s Designer range of products, the PD2710QC is a 27 inch 2K QHD monitor. This particular model comes with the claim of being BenQ’s first USB Type-C display product to take advantage of the latest USB technology.
As can sometime happen when sample products are passed from reviewer to reviewer, some components can tend to go missing.  The arrival of the PD2710QC product proved to be a case in point.  The content of the delivered package consisted of the LCD Monitor pane; stand arm and a base unit which doubles as an additional docking element.
A rather nice 27inch panel from Philips, which should be able to give you 2560x1440 resolution which is that step up from the default offering these days of 1920x1080. It has a good colour gamut and shows well in a whole range of lighting conditions.
The panel is 62x37x1.7cm and the stand 23x20cm raises it by between 4 and 17cm from your desk. The viewable screen is 60x34cm which gives the notional diagonal imperial measurement of 27inches. The line of connections on the rear are Digital, HDMI, Display Port and VGA, there is a 3.5mm audio input for VGA as well as headphone output socket, all these are on the left side of the unit with the kettle style power lead entering on the right rear side there is also a flip up on/off switch.
878517 BenQ SW2700PT Photographer Monito

BenQ 27inch

For those who have an interest in photography then a specialised ‘RGB’ unit such as this offering from BenQ could well solve the problem of getting the colour correct, this unit guarantees 99% correct Adobe RGB colour space.
While this unit can operate as a standard panel for all the normal home and office tasks the extra top and side shields when fitted give that exact colour that the photographer craves. Having recently unhooked a 4K offering it’s nice to be let down slightly more gently with a QHD 2560x1440 offering as a stop before returning to my own HD offering 1920x1080. It is 64x37x2cm without the shield in place.
The 276E9QJAB/00 is one of a series of three 27 inch 1920 x 1080 full HD computer monitors employing what Philips describes as Ultra-Wide Color technology aimed at the home & office markets.
Offering a wide range of viewing features is a monitor from BenQ aimed at designers.
Delivering more than one billion colours, the BenQ PD2700Q product is a 27-inch monitor for use on either a Windows or Mac computer.  This monitor is aimed specifically at the creative and designer fraternity as they take advantage of the product’s range of viewing angles and display modes.  My review is based on using the monitor running a Windows 7 computer.
This is a large panel with high resolution that should – for most – be just plug and play, it certainly was for me, my Desktop system normally has a 21inch panel running at 1920x1080, this unit was plugged in and the HDMI lead connected and I was looking at a screen showing 4k resolution that’s 3840x2160 and while icons were smaller all I had done was plugged in and switched on.
Yes it was a Windows 10 system completely up to date and the Auto display was at 150% but everything worked correctly. For some reason some of my desktop items moved to unusual places on the screen but once put back and ‘refreshed’ they stayed in position, a couple of older programs – note programs not Apps – failed to scale up but nothing that made them unusable. It is 74x44x2.5cm; the viewable screen is 70x39.
This is very thin in fact so thin that the only connection is in the leg of the base of the unit which in turn goes to a fitment that looks rather like a power brick and then everything power and computer connection via HDMI goes from there.
The unit comes with the stand already attached, the screen is 54x32x.5cm, this is raised 9cm from your desk by the stand, the stand is 24x18cm in a ‘C’ shape only the left side arm connects to the screen. This means the open end of the ‘C’ shape lays flat on your desk and this is where the supplied lead connects the power and HDMI signal via a 60cm long lead that goes into one end of the 14.5x6x4cm block that is not only the power supply but also the HDMI connection.
A large flat panel showing 1920x1080 may seem like overkill for spreadsheets or word processing but of course if you have 20:20 vision you can change the % rate shown, as an example a notebook will often show the display at 150% or 125% this defaults to 100% so you see a lot more.
Large panels are useful for group viewing and as almost all recent panels have near 180degree viewing angles you can gather a lot of people around one and it’s normally much easier than connecting a projector and it also avoids having to find a blank piece of wall that the projector would require for display. It is 62x37x1.5cm its stand raises it by between 8 and 21cm from your desk. The total weight of the unit is 7KG. It can be used either portrait or landscape.
As a member of Philips S Line range of business monitors, the Quad-HD 27inch 272S4LPJCB ticks all the right boxes for the discerning user. It provides 2560 x 1440 native resolution, is mounted on an ergonomic stand, provides a range of features and offers a choice of connectivity. In addition, Philips claims that it is built using 25% recycled materials.
For me anyway the extra sound - quality and amount – that Dell can give you from a panel is a big plus if only from the point of desk space and the fact that you no longer need a pair of speakers on your limited amount of desk space.
This 22 inch monitor from Dell measures 49x29x1.5cm and its stand lifts it 10cm from your desk. The notional diagonal imperial measurement is 21½ inches. The area above and to the sides has virtually no border with only 1cm border at the bottom. It is of course a full HD offering (1920x1080) and allows you to connect via HDMI or VGA. The stand is ‘D’ shaped at 24x15cm; this connects to the arm from the panel by a twist screw.
Big it is, and the curve means that the centre is 3cm further in than the outside and unless you are viewing from a good distance away it is certainly noticeable. However while sound is often low on this list of priorities here there are fantastic up facing speakers mounted in the rear.
Most speakers in panels are at best ‘average’ here they are superb as the extra depth is used to have great up pointing speakers in the back. While – for me anyway – the red line of LEDs under the base of the screen and the two pairs of red LED lines of lights on the back do little they may suit some. You would never buy this panel for word processing or spreadsheets this is a gaming or video watching panel.
If you have a clear desk policy then with your PC under the desk you still need to connect various peripherals and the best way to do that is a USB hub so if this hub lives in the item that need to be on the desk - the panel - all you need is the keyboard and mouse and you are working. If you still have a cluttered desk then this panel can help.
This Philips monitor measures 54x32x1.7cm with the last figure at the edge. The stand is a circle with a chunk taken out of it at the front, 27cm from side to side and 24cm back to front. There is a telescopic arm that connects the stand to the rear of the panel. The arm itself extends 42cm from the desk with the panel being able to be raised between 5 and 21cm from the desk. The panel can also be used in a portrait orientation, the swivel is anti-clockwise.
A flat panel that has speakers is the norm these days, they are normally tiny and do not have much volume, here something different as the speakers fit into the stand of the panel, so they can be larger and also give a far better sound.
The Dell S2418H full HD monitor measures 54x30.5x1.5cm; its stand will raise it from your desk by 10cm. The stand is a frame in the shape of a landscaped ‘D’ and the supplied speaker fits in it .5cm at the front (flat edge) and 3cm at the rear, it has two buttons + and – to control the volume. There is a short grey lead that emerges from the rear of the speaker which connects to the panel; the audio signal is transferred via the HDMI connection from the panel to the speaker.
Forming part of its business-orientated Pro-line brand of products is the AOC new 90 Series of offerings. One of these new models making up this new series is the 12490PXQU which forms the subject matter of this review.
While the 12490PXQU panel can be wall-mounted, this does require the purchase of an additional supporting arm, I have been looking at the free-standing unit.  This comes with a two-piece ergonomically designed adjustable stand.  Consisting of a circular base, which connects via a thumb style screw to the upper support arm, this stand is coloured a fairly tasteful matte gun-metal grey.  Forming part of the support arm is an adjustable square plate.
This is a flat panel to fit easily on your desk; it protects your eyes for those of us who need to look at a flat panel for hours each day. This latest offering from Philips is a full HD offering at 1920x1080 and the actual viewable screen is 23.8inches.
The screen is 53.5x31.5x1cm and the screen is raised 8.5cm by the 20x20cm stand which clips into a link which has a thumbscrew connection so less than a minute to assemble. As with most recent panels Windows finds a perfectly acceptable driver and really your only choice is whether to connect by VGA or HDMI. It is called an edge to edge display, the top and sides have a very small border with the bottom one being around 1.5cm.
This is defiantly a curved panel which may seem a strange comment but a lot of earlier screens could almost look flat from not that far away, here this 27 inch offering could never be mistaken for a flat panel however far away you are.
This Philips Curved LCD monitor (model 278E8QJAB) measures 61x36.5x1cm; the stand is an open half-moon 40cm wide and 19cm deep. The stand raises the unit by 11cm from your desk. There is a good amount of back tilt stated at 20 degrees and a little forward tilt stated at 5 degrees; there is no side to side movement. The centre of the screen is 2.5cm further in than the edges. The viewable screen is 60.5x34.5cm which gives the notional diagonal imperial measurement of 27inches.
This has a very small edge top and both sides and only a normal size at the base, it is also very thin. However the most important thing is the quality of the image on the screen, this is excellent and while I tried with the controls to better the ‘Auto’ settings I failed.
It is 53.5x31x.5cm the last figure at the edges. The viewable screen is 53.3x30.2cm which gives the notional imperial diagonal measurement of more than 23¾ inches it’s actually 23.8inches. The stand is a ‘V’ shape back to front so it’s only .5cm at the back and 30.5cm at the front in total it is 19.5cm from back to front. A little surprisingly it is a standard 1920x1080 display.
Having recently looked at various large and high resolution panels there is something soothing about a panel of average size with average resolution. This offering the GW2270 is exactly what the review below is all about, a 22inch panel displaying 1920x1080.
The display is 50x30x1.6cm the last figure at the edges, it has an ‘L’ shaped arm connected to a 28x12cm stand, the central 6cm is another 7cm deep to keep the unit stable on your desk. The notional imperial diagonal measurement is 21½ inches. There is only a couple of degrees of forward movement and a good 15% of back movement. There is no side to side movement but as the unit is quite light it is easy to turn the unit and stand.
Most panels show you a screen of information, some do it with low Blue Light, and some have the ability to rotate so you can see your screen in portrait mode. This offering from Philips however is a first for me having a changing colour display in the base.
It is 60x36x1.5cm at the edge. The stand is circular at 23cm with the connecting arm attaching to the back edge. The stand raises the screen by 10cm from the base and the screen has 20 degrees of back tilt and 10 degrees of forward tilt, there is no side to side movement. There is no assembly required as the unit comes from the box with the stand already connected.